Why X’s think they’re the best

Commenter Alex pointed out this excellent post, Why Doctors Think They’re the Best, by Scott Alexander, who writes:

Ninety percent of drivers think they’re above-average drivers, ninety percent of professors think they’re above-average professors etc. The relevant studies are paywalled, so I don’t know if I [Alexander] should trust them. . . . But I am pretty sure ninety percent of doctors believe they’re above-average doctors. Here are some traps I’ve noticed myself falling into that might help explain why:

1. Your patients’ last doctor was worse than you. . . .
2. Your patients love you. . . .
3. Patients often come to you, but never leave you. . . .
4. You’ve probably successfully treated most of your patients. . . .
5. You know what you know, but you don’t know what you don’t know. . . .
6. Your victories belong to you, your failures belong to Nature. . . .
7. You do a good job satisfying your own values. . . .

Good stuff. And this makes me wonder: To what extent do these biases hold for other groups? Do doctors think they’re the best more than other groups think they’re the best? I expect there’s lots of relevant research on this topic in the judgment and decision making literature.